Elastomeric Paints

Elastomeric PintsHaving been given the opportunity in applying elastomeric paint on a wide range of substrates, I have had the experience in dealing with both the success and failures of it. With the right elastomeric and the right substrate, in my opinion there is no other paint that can give an exterior substrate a better result. It bridges those unpleasant hairline cracks, expands and contracts to prevent future cracks from appearing, shields out moisture, resists mildew, has great wash ability, and the beauty of the angular sheen finish that will last years. However, it would only take one elastomeric failure to have second thoughts on it. Usually the failure is resulting from poor preparation, improper application, the wrong elastomeric product was applied, or the substrate not being a good fit for elastomeric at all.

To help you better understand, here is 3 characteristics qualities I want to briefly touch on, Bridging, Elasticity, and Water Vapor Permeability (prem rating).

  • Bridging – is when the coating film becomes thick enough to act as a bridge over a gap or crack through its cohesion and elastic qualities. DFT (dry film thickness) range from 12-24 mills
  • Elasticity – The flexibility of the paint film. elastomerics elongation ranges from 160% – 360%
  • Water Vapor Permeability – (prem rating). – The ability of the coating to permit water to pass through it. Elastomerics range from 5-22 prems

There are 2 types of elastomerics, one is the standard which I call the high build, the other is known as a hybrid. It is important that you have the proper elastomeric for your substrate. If not, you could be looking at issues like thisThe above picture is a commercial building I drive by daily. They originally painted the building with a regular paint, but big cracks appeared as the building settled, they had it repainted in a high build elastomeric for cosmetic reasons, it was a face lift that went all wrong.

Elastomeric FailureThe heavy build was the 1st elastomeric coating on paint manufacture shelves. It was designed to be a water-proofing coating. With that it had to be thick to bridge cracks (up to1/16”), and the elongation to prevent cracks from surfacing so water could not intrude. The heavy build elastomeric has a softer shell than a regular acrylic paint and gets softer in hotter elements. With it being soft it is easier for dirt to stick to it, dirt can actually embed itself in the coating. It is important that the coating does not break or tear, the substrate has to be free of open areas like around windows, vents, pipes, etc. The structure needs to be examined for any potential area where water can intrude to determine if the heavy build is the right fit. Due to its low prem rating (2-4), if moisture penetrates it can get trapped between the substrate and the heavy-build elastomeric.  The coating would then do its job, just on the wrong side. It will shield the moisture in, with the elasticity it creates those water balloon bubbles you seen in the above picture. The heavy-build has its uses on the right substrate, most residential structures are not. The heavy build is mostly used on commercial buildings.  Most paint manufactures won’t even have it available, as they have recommended residential painters to use the hybrid.

As residential painters begin to use the high build, some were creating their own elastomeric paint by mixing 100% acrylic flat paint with the high build elastomeric. This would turn it to a medium build elastomeric, with a higher perm rating, less elasticity and more resistant to dirt pick up. Paint manufactures were getting concerned with painters making their own paint in the field. As a result they started formulating a new elastomeric product which is considered the hybrid elastomeric. The hybrid elastomeric is a medium build 100% acrylic with the 3 characteristics qualities of elastomeric, bridging, elasticity, with a greater water vapor permeability rate. Unlike the heavy body the new hybrid could be applied on both stucco/concrete and wood, including bridging those vertical cracks in T 111 siding with the elasticity to keep them from appearing for years. The hybrid elastomeric has a harder shell with the ability to maintain its shell in warmer clients, meaning it can also resist dirt pick up. The new hybrid elastomerics have exceeded both manufactures and applicators expectations becoming a premium coating to apply on an exterior surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is best to consult with a professional paint contractor that is experienced with elastomerics in your demographic area.. The following hybrid elastomeric products I recommend on the right substrate. Vista Paint 1900 Weather Master, Sherwin Williams Loxon xp, Glidden Decra Flex 300, and Dunn Edwards Paint Endurawall

51 replies
  1. Mark
    Mark says:

    I have a customer with elastomeric (behr) coating on stucco. Stucco has major bubbling due to efflorescence. I was recommending not going with an elastomeric over elastomeric, I use Dunn Endwards and was inquiring if D&E’s Evershield will adhere to behrs elastomeric.

    thanks

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      To answer your question Yes, Dunn Edwards Evershield will work without a warranty. You are absolutely right in recommending against applying another elastomeric coating on top of the existing coating, by doing so it can intensify the problem.

      After researching BEHR Elastomeric I have come to believe it is a product you would want to run from. It has a very high elongation (600% with 3 coats), with a DFT of 13-15 mils. I cannot find a perm rating for the BEHR elastomeric, most likely it has a low perm rating being the final DFT is high along with a high elongation. This can result in trapping the moisture behind the coating, if moisture was to intrude. BEHR Elastomeric product looks to be an out of date elastomeric.

      Here are my recommendations for a cure

      For a cure with a warranty:
      It is not recommended to apply a non-elastomeric coating over an elastomeric coating, unless the elasticity has expired. If it has not expired, the non-elastomeric cannot handle the expansion and contractions over the elastomeric. Being that the Behr product has a high elongation; the non-elastomeric can’t handle that elongation. It can result in the top coat cracking and/or a cohesion failure. The best cure would be to remove the elastomeric (sand blast) get it back to the raw substrate. But we all know that could be a very expensive cure and frankly just unpractical.

      Non warranty cure:
      1. Cut out affected areas
      2. Spot prime (preferred oil base) the areas you cut out.
      3. Patch where needed.
      4. Apply a preferably oil base prime to seal all unseen pin holes.
      5. Apply 100% acrylic paint (Dunn Edwards Evershield)
      Going with this method you or your client will need to watch the substrate for the next 5 years or until the elasticity of the original coating has expired. There may be other affected areas that will resurface, usually during or after a rain storm. The key is to fix it with the above method as soon as it appears. So make sure you talk to your prospect for a maintenance plan. You will need to warn them that if the issue resurfaces to contact you immediately. If they don’t the affected areas can lay back down making it harder to find.

      Reply
  2. Jason
    Jason says:

    Great info on this site, thanks for sharing your knowledge.

    I’m undecided if I should use a hybrid elasto or an acrylic latex to paint the exterior concrete foundation walls (above grade) around my house. The house is about 45 yrs old and other than a few small patch repairs I made recently and scraping off the old paint (in preparation for new painting) the walls are in good shape. I live in Toronto, Canada and would appreciate your input if an elasto (more specifically the Decraflex) is ideal for this application or if a good exterior latex is suitable enough. Also, do you recommend a primer? The Glidden paint store in my area suggested it’s not necessary. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Hello Jason, thank you for visiting my blog. I’m glad you found information here to help with your painting project.

      It is possible to use DecraFlex on your substrate but, I would take into consideration that your structure may not have a weep screed or it is buried. I am a bit leery of apply elastomeric on a surface where water can not escape. A weep screed runs along at the base of stucco walls with drain holes, allowing moisture to escape. By sealing up a wall that has no weep screed, water can get trapped between the stucco and the coating.

      Why are you thinking you need elastomeric? Do you have hairline cracks? If no, DevFlex may be overkill. A good exterior 100% Acrylic paint like Benjamin Moores Aura or Sherwin Williams Duration would give you a long lasting finish. I don’t know Glidden Professional exterior acrylic paints well enough to recommend one.

      Primers for concrete surfaces are mainly for bonders and resistance to efflorescence and alkalinity. If the surface is painted, it is not necessary to prime unless the surface is chalky, then a primer is a must. You do need to prime any patches you made or areas where paint has been scrapped off. There are benefits in applying a primer coat over a existing coating. It increases the adhesion strength between the prime coat and substrate, and the prime coat and finish coat. It Increases color retention, resists checking and cracking, Alleviates shadowing giving a better overall
      finished product.

      I hope I answered you question. Feel free ask if you have any more questions.

      Reply
  3. Tim
    Tim says:

    Hi …and thank you for your professional opinion on elastometric paint. We live in Maine and just purchased a home in Florida. I have never had to paint a stucco exterior house as all the houses in New England are wood or vinyl exteriors. Ben Moore and SW have worked very well up here but I was quite unsure about the right paint to use on the east coast of FL. I am now leaning toward a good exterior latex paint.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Hello and thank you for visiting my blog!
      I am in California where 90% of housing has stucco/concrete exterior surfaces. I don’t think it would differ much in Florida. Since you have had good result with Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore, I will recommend their products for exterior stucco, as I have had success with them myself. I highly recommend you follow the product specs, as I do not know the condition of your surface. The links are provided bellow, for Benjamin Moore click on Technical Data Sheets Even though the products spec no primer needed, I would recommend priming to achieve a premium long lasting finish.

      Sherwin Williams – Duration Exterior Acrylic Latex

      Benjamin Moore – Aura Waterborne Exterior Paint

      Reply
  4. Jason
    Jason says:

    Thanks for your advice, I think after reading your response I’m leaning towards using the Duration, it will probably be more than adequate for the application I’m doing. What primer do you recommend using with the Duration? I was thinking two coats of the Duration should be OK, the first coat as a primer and then a second top coat (flat) finish. Also, does the Duration have a good perm rating?

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      If the substrate is raw, meaning never been painted before, I would recommend priming with Sherwin William Loxon Primer. Even though Duration is a self priming paint, priming will increase the adhesion strengths, resistance to alkali and efflorescence, and the longevity of the coating. I would do one coat primer and 2 coats finish for premium results, however 2 coats of Duration will do the job. if the surface is chalky it is a must to prime.

      “Moisture vapor is more likely to pass through acrylic latex paint films than through solvent alkyd types. It’s true that application of additional coatings will reduce moisture vapor transmission, simply on the basis of increased film thickness. However, even with several coats applied, the latex film will be adequately permeable to water vapor and better than alkyd paint films of comparable thickness.” Sherwin Williams FAQ

      The perm rating with paints like Duration is not as important as dealing with elastomerics, because elastomerics act as a water proffer, Duration is not. Sherwin Williams does not specify it because it is not a issue, as Duration is more adequately permeable to water vapor.

      Reply
  5. John Clearwater
    John Clearwater says:

    I have a customer whose stucco home in Arizona is painted with Dun Edwards Elastomeric. Prior to painting they applied XTS Caulk to fill all of the many cracks. They put 4 sprayed on backed rolled coats. The paint has not cracked in any place.

    The issue is that where the XTS Caulk was used, you see a more original color versus a washed out (chalked) color. I was told that because the XTS had a higher UV protectant, is has leached through the elastomeric and those reduced the chalking/fading impact of the sun.

    The home owner wants to paint the house again using elastomeric only he wants me to add a lot more UV additive to the Elastomeric to avoid any future show through. What is the formula or recommendation for adding the UV additive per 5 gal pail and do you highly recommend any UV product and or elastomeric paint.

    The customer is very intelligent and knows a lot of potential high paying influential customers so I do not want to have him ticked at me in five years as I continue to expand my painting business… need all the referrals I can get.

    Thank you,
    John Clearwater

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Hello, thank you for posting on my Blog! I do apoligize for not replying sooner, my grandmother has just passed away so I have been dealing with that.

      To better understand you I would like to move the communication through email so I can better understand the issue. After I get a clear understanding I will reply here so others may benefit from this as well.
      Thanks, and I will wait for your answer.
      Gabe

      Reply
  6. arnold young
    arnold young says:

    I have elastomeric paint on my stucco house, and it has performed very well for more than ten years. looks good but I think needs to be repainted.
    1. Consideration surface is good, except for pressure washing, is it ok to use just one coat.

    2. I have plastic shutters. Good shape but faded. Can I paint the plastic shutters with elastomeric? they are slightly rough (as they were new), but certainly not nearly as rough as stucco. I prefer elastomeric is ok to use because it lasts so we.. thanks..

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      I would rinse off the surface let dry and reapply your coating. One coat is good enough assuming you have adequate mills from the previous coating. It is best to repaint with a coat of elastomeric very 5 years as the elasticity expires in 5 years.

      I would not paint the pastic shutter with elastomeric, as it elastomeric should be on a porous substrate. After priming I would use a high end 100% acrylic matte finnish like Sherwin Williams Duration.

      Reply
  7. Heidi
    Heidi says:

    Thank you for your blog. We live in a wood frame stucco house in southern NM. The house is 21 years old and still has the original stucco. We have been seriously considering elastomeric to repair cracks and flaws, but a friend who had it done recently warned us against it because the moisture from rain and sprinklers becomes trapped under the elastomeric and causes problems. What do you suggest? Is there a way to avoid this problem and are there any other issues with elastomeric I should be aware of?

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      I would have to look at the substrate to properly determine if elastomeric is the right fit for your surface. If you have sprinklers hitting the surface on a daily bases, that can be a problem with any coating as it ages it faster. Sherwin Williams Loxon may be a better fit for you, it has the ability to bridge cracks and has elasticity. What unique about Loxon is it also allows moisture to escape if it were to get behind the coating.

      Reply
  8. Cindi
    Cindi says:

    Hi and thank you in advance for sharing your expertise!

    Background: We are having our commercial brick and mostly block building repainted. The contractor quoted elastomeric. I am familiarizing myself with the product and landed here. We don’t have major cracking issues but we do have a small amount of surface defacing, for lack of a better word. It’s like the top level of concrete block has cracked off in some areas. This building was built around 1940, I would guess. This locale does deal with some heavy rains and many days of 100+ temperatures. The building is approximately 65×100, long, solid walls with no windows except in the front. The long sides get full on east and west sun exposure in this retail establishment.

    Wondering about a few things… Does this seem an appropriate product for this application? I am gathering lighter colors are preferred? Also, it seems more of a sheen may be available with BenMoore vs SW, along with better color matching. Does this seem true? Seems like a satin finish would be more richer looking than a flat but it’s hard for me to imagine on such a long span of building. And would the TexCote give a nice finish that might help blend (or blur) some of then irregularities that are typical in old buildings? Thanks so much.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Without seeing the substrate it is hard for me to determine if elastomeric would be a good fit for you. Make sure your contractor knows what he is doing, if he has been in the industry long enough he should. Some paint contractors use a elastomeric as a fix all, sometimes that just being a band aid, temporary fix that can come back at you later.

      You are correct about light colors as dark colors attract heat causing the coating to work harder, this will age the coating faster.

      All elastomerics have a satin finish. Due to the high acrylics and high build its nearly impossible to have a flat finish which is why BM calls it satin. Some will have a lower sheen than others called a angler sheen also known as matte.

      Reply
  9. Mary
    Mary says:

    Thanks in advance for your advice. I have a family home in Utah that is about 100 years old. Main house and separate garage. The stucco is in great condition but has ALOT of hairline cracks. I would like to minimize the appearance of those cracks and prevent further damage they may create. Should I use an elastomeric paint? I have looked at Home Depot’s Behr brand but saw that you don’t recommend it. What potential problems could I experience? Or should I just prime and paint with an acrylic paint and not worry about it?

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      I would not use BHER elastomeric paint because of its low perm rating. This is how much moisture can escape out if moisture were to get behind the coating. With the required mill and the perm rating so low you could end up with a mess on your hands. Sherwin Williams Loxon or Sherlastic are much better elastomeric product as far as breathabilty is concerned.

      I can not answer if elastomeric would be a good fit for your substrate without looking at it. There are so many reasons why it wouldn’t be, have a experienced paint contractor examine if it would be. I would also suggest having a experienced contractor apply the product as well.

      Reply
  10. Stacy Berman
    Stacy Berman says:

    Hello, I am trying to figure out which paint to use to paint my stucco home, the house is about 15 years old and hasn’t been painted since it was build. I know that I have some trapped moisture in certain places, currently have no plans to re-do the stucco. I heard amazing things about elastomeric paint, but not sure if its the right way to go due to some minor moisture problems. We live in the Northeast and get rain and snow and low temperatures during the winter with lots of humidity in the summer. What would you suggest?

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      If you are experiencing moisture getting trapped behind the substrate, elastomeric would fail under those circumstances. Any coating would, you 1st need to fix that issue before applying any coating.

      I’m not sure how moisture is getting trapped behind raw stucco as stucco is not a sealed surface. You might have a leak or something causing a continuous moisture.

      Reply
  11. JEFF DUNLAP
    JEFF DUNLAP says:

    HI,
    FIRST OF ALL, I WANT TO THANK YOU FOR THIS VERY INFORMATIVE BLOG. THIS HAS THE BEST INFORMATION AROUND (INCLUDING SOME PAINT STORES).
    I HAVE TWO BUILDINGS AND WANT TO PAINT THE SOUTH FACING WALLS WITH ELASTOMERIC PAINT. BUILDING #1 HAS NEWER STUCCO (8-9 YEARS OLD) AND HAS NEVER BEEN PAINTED. THIS BUILDING HAS A METAL STUCCO STOP AT THE BOTTOM OF THE STUCCO.
    BUILDING #2 IS A 75 YEAR OLD RESIDENCE WITH OLD TROWELED ON STUCCO (PLASTER). IT HAS SOME HAIRLINE CRACKING BUT IS IN OTHERWISE GOOD SHAPE. THERE IS NO BOTTOM STOP ON THE STUCCO, IN OTHER WORDS, THE STUCCO GOES RIGHT DOWN TO THE DIRT. I THINK THIS IS HOW THEY DID IT IN THE OLD DAYS. CAN I STILL PAINT WITH ELASTOMERIC OR WOULD I INVITE A MOISTURE PROBLEM. I WANT THE QUALITIES THAT ELASTOMERIC HAS TO OFFER, BUT DON’T WANT TO MAKE A PROBLEM WHERE NON EXISTED. IF NEED BE, I CAN DIG DOWN TO THE EDGE OF THE STUCCO AND PUT IN DRAIN LINES AND BACKFILL WITH GRAVEL. I LIVE IN CALIFORNIA. THANKS SO MUCH AHEAD OF TIME FOR YOUR ADVICE.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      With elastomeric you really should paint the entire substrate, meaning all side, north, south, east and west walls. Elastomeric should not be applied to just one problematic wall. Doing so leaves openings at each stopping point of the coating. It would be better to use Benjamin Moore Aura exterior flat finish. This paint has a build and can bridge hairline cracks.

      Reply
  12. john blackwell
    john blackwell says:

    We live in Arizona and painted our newly stuccoed house with Dunn Edwards elastomeric paint 11 years ago. I now know that the elasticity lasts only 5 years. Now there are spider web cracks in the paint. My question is how to repair the cracks in the paint and what paint to use for repainting the house?

    Thanks John Blackwell

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      If it is only hairline cracking you can just reapply one coat of a qualified hybrid elastomeric product (consult a profesional painting contractor). If a elasticmeric is not desired you can apply a 100% acrylic flat finish on top of the expired elastimeric.

      Reply
      • john
        john says:

        The cracks are in the paint only. The stucco is fine. Should I peel the cracked paint and if I do is there anything that needs to go on the bare stucco before the elasticmeric or flat acrylic. Your info is really great.
        Thanks

        Reply
  13. john
    john says:

    Your info will really help when I choose my Paint Contractor. I will know what questions to ask. Thanks again!

    John Blackwell

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Thank you, I’m glad it has been helpful, more so I appreciate your confidence in me. As a contractor it can be frustrating when homeowners are basing their decision on price rather than value in a true professionalism in our industry. So thank you for taking the time to make that important in your decision making for your project.
      Gabe

      Reply
  14. Veronica Haberthuer
    Veronica Haberthuer says:

    I was looking for information about “Deck & Dock Elastometric Coating” http://www.superdeck.com and found your blog. Do you know anything about this brand? I live in Anchorage Alaska and want to apply a paint or coating on a 24 x 4 foot cement roofed walkway that runs along the front of the house. There are a few flaws in the cement which I will patch. The cement has never had a paint applied on the surface. Is this a product that you recommend? I thought it would help cover some of the flaws and provide a nice color. Thanks

    Reply
  15. Maria
    Maria says:

    Hello there! First of all, thank you for writing this blog. This is very helpful to me right now. We’re having out exterior painted real soon. I live in FL and we had a recent water intrusion inside the house coming from the stucco cracks. We already had 6 painters come in to do an estimate. And 5 out of 6 are suggesting elastomeric paint. I guess this would be the best paint to use to seal the cracks and prevent future water intrusion. Now, another question is what brand? 1 of them says Behr, 2 others are Sherwin Williams, and 2 more are going for Richard’s paint (i think they’re local paint company but they sell benjamin moore paints too). It’s so hard to make a decision. Any suggestions is much appreciated. Thank you!

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Maria, I know how this can get confusing and difficult to know you are making the right decision for your home.

      1st let’s deal with the water intrusion, is the water entering the inside of your home? If so then you may have other issues and elastomeric will just be a band aid fix. It is hard for me to determine if elastomeric is the right choice for you without actually seeing the structure. It may be wise to have a general contractor look at your home, either a remodeling or home builder contractor. A painting contractor may not be qualified to determine where the water is intruding. Last thing you would want is to pay good money for a elastomeric coating system only to find that your problems are worse off than you had. Along with getting a general contractors opinion, you could also request a Sherwin Williams representive to come out and evaluate your surface so they could determine if it is fit for elastomeric. Which leads me to product choice. I would NOT use Bher elastomeric nor would I use a contractor specing Bher. Benjamin Moore has qualified products as well as Sherwin Williams. Both should be able to evaluate your surface.

      Before you make any decision in painting it is critical to determine where and how the water is intruding. Even though you have cracks in your stucco, there is paper behind your stucco which is what actually stop water from entering your home. So it is possible water may be entering in other areas.

      If you would like you can send me pictures at info@ewingpainting.net

      Reply
  16. LeAnn
    LeAnn says:

    Hi,
    We live in Victoria BC and have a 1960s stucco home that we recently had painted with a Sherwin Williams elastomeric paint. The painter brushed it on rather than spraying, and although he did two coats, when we examine very closely, we can still see tiny spots where the original stucco shows through in places. My question is, whether this lack of uniformity in coverage could cause problems with the performance of the paint or moisture problems. Aesthetically it’s not a big deal to us.
    Thank you for your advice.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      LeAnn,
      I would be concerned if you can still see the original stucco color. Elastomeric need build for its elasticity, the thinner the film the less elasticity. Sherwin Williams elastomeric product are either Sherlastic (requires 10-14 mils wet; 4.0-6.0 mils dry, or it Loxon (requires 10-14 mils wet; 4.0-6.0 mils dry). Both if applied according to the required mills would be adequate enough to cover the existing stucco color. Even though your painter hand applied it I would be concerned if he/she thinned it for easier application. If you are able to see the existing color in spot, this means those spots have a lower film build, weakening the elasticity. this can causing the coating to break open easier which can result in water intrusion behind the coating. I would recommend to reapply another adequate coat of the Sherwin Williams Elastomeric product by a professional Paint Contractor that has the proper tools for applying elastomeric.

      Reply
  17. Rob
    Rob says:

    Your blog is very informative so I am hoping you are provide me some insight. I live in Orlando Fl and looking to repaint my home which is primarily stucco. i received 2 quotes from contractors and wondered which way is the better way to go for exterior paint. The first contractor said he uses system of Sherwin Williams Elastromeric Luxon Primer and then 1 coat for Satin Sherwin Williams SuperPaint Acrylic Latex. The second said he does 2 coates of Sherwin Williams SuperPaint Acrylic Latex. Which is a better system for Florida? I have some had minor water intrusion in the past with wind driven rain during our hurricane seasons. Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Rob,
      I do not recommend enamel (satin/eg-shell/semigloss finish) on stucco primarily because enamels have a harder shell which can not flex as much as a flat finish, this can result in cracking and peeling. 2nd, a satin finish will have a harder time allowing moisture to escape, if moisture were to get behind the satin finish it would just pop the coating off. I would also be concerned with the compatibility with Loxon primer with a Satin finish on stucco, as Loxon primer has a higher rate of elongation than a satin finish, this can result in the satin finish crackling as the primer expands and contracts.

      It seems to me the 2nd con tractor that recommended the Superpaint system has the right system for your stucco substrate. I would recommend studying the product data pages from both contractors. Here is the SuperPaint Flat PDS

      Reply
      • Rob
        Rob says:

        I appreciate your insight. What is your take on SW Duration verses SW Superpaint…..is Duration worth the additional cost over the Superpaint? Also if I am reading your comments correctly you would recommend going with the Flat finish on the SW luxon primer even though it will not have a richer paint look. Does one of the system above have better water intrusion protection? I was not clear on that answer from above.

        Reply
  18. Tim
    Tim says:

    Hello,
    Great blog! I painted my house with an elastameric paint about 4yrs ago. It was to cover the “pebbles in cement” type finish from the 50’s. The paint has worked GREAT… still looks fantastic. I’d like to change the colors now. I dont know what type of elastimeric paint i used last time. Do I paint over it now with another elastimeric paint or can I use a different type of paint? what are the options and what is best?

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Tim,
      I don’t know what demographic area you are from so I will suggest a product from Sherwin Williams since they are national. Depending on if your elastomeric coating has expired, I will assume it hasn’t as that would be the best bet with out looking at it. Sherwin Williams Loxon XP or Sherwin Williams Sherlastic are both great product, study the product data page for proper preparation and applications recommendations.

      Reply
  19. John
    John says:

    Thanks for an informative blog.

    If I understand correctly, there isn’t anything inherently wrong with an elastomeric coating. Like any other material, the key is in determining suitability for the intended purpose/conditions, and proper preparation/application.

    I have a CA two-story stucco home that was last painted about 15 years ago, with Kelly Moore, including an elasto coating. The western exposure has to endure the brunt of winter storms, with rain driven heavily by wind that is sometimes strong enough to make the house, or at least the walls, shudder. The stucco surrounding the windows had to be redone after they were replaced with double-panes, due to poor workmanship, so this wall is also rife with areas with potential to crack.

    Given the time and conditions, the current paint job is in pretty decent condition, with marginal chalking, and there haven’t been any issues with the coating bubbling or any other separation.

    As I consider the new batch of bids, only one contractor has specified such a coating (with the highest cost, naturally). I have asked the others to submit revised bids to also include a coating (KM 1128).

    I’m leaning toward repeating the same type of paint job KM primer/coating/paint, but am open to suggestion, pro or con. I imagine paint technology has advance at least some in the time since.

    Reply
    • ewingpainting
      ewingpainting says:

      Having great success with the existing Kelly Moore Esatomeric coating, I would recommended going with the same coating. Other compatible coating would be Vista Paint Weathermaster or Sherwin Williams Loxon. Primer is only necessary on a raw, patched, stained or chalky surface. Apply the specified mills

      Reply
  20. Dean Semsun
    Dean Semsun says:

    Thank you for the information in your website. I had a painter recommend to me elastomeric on my home near the beach. I have had moisture intrusion issues and after reading your blog I don’t think it is a good idea until I address those areas. Thanks again!!!!

    Reply
    • Gabe Ewing
      Gabe Ewing says:

      Dean You are correct! You should always address moisture intrusion issues with the structure before applying any paint. Doing so is just a band aid fix and cause more issues to snowball.

      Reply
  21. Tomika
    Tomika says:

    Thanks for the information. I have been searching for information on elastomerics and finally came across your site. Very helpful. THANKS!!!!

    Reply

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